Lawyers & Judges Publishing Company, Inc.
Cart 0
Medicolegal Aspects of Influenza (Flu): Coronavirus (COVID-19), Swine Flu (H1N1), and Avian Flu (H5N1) PDF eBook - Lawyers & Judges Publishing Company, Inc.

Medicolegal Aspects of Influenza (Flu): Coronavirus (COVID-19), Swine Flu (H1N1), and Avian Flu (H5N1) PDF eBook

$ 49.00

  • Author: Steve Weintraub

  • ISBN 10: 1-936360-80-2

  • ISBN 13: 978-1-936360-80-2

  • Copyright Date Ed:  March 4th, 2020

  • Pages: 332

  • PDF eBook

Medicolegal Aspects of Influenza (Flu): Coronavirus (COVID-19), Swine Flu (H1N1), and Avian Flu (H5N1) is a book that discusses topics pertaining to various influenzas that the world has had to deal with. The coronavirus, swine flu, and avian flu are the major influenzas that are touched on in this book. Some topics include the history of the flu, symptoms and how to treat them, as well as how to prepare for and prevent getting the flu.

Tables of Contents

Preface - Coronavirus Disease           

Chapter 1: History of Flu

1.1 Seasonal Flu           

     A. How does seasonal flu spread?

     B. Who is at risk?

     C. What are common complications from the seasonal flu?

     D. How long does the illness last and how long am I contagious?

     E. Is the stomach flu really the flu?

     F. Who monitors seasonal flu activity?

     G. Related Links

References           

Chapter 2: Symptoms & Treatments           

2.1 Symptoms           

     A. Flu Symptoms
     B. Flu Test
     C. What are the Symptoms of the Flu?
     D. Do I Have the Flu or a Cold?
     E. When Should I Seek Emergency Medical Attention?
     F. I am a U.S. resident experiencing some flu-like symptoms (e.g. fever, headache, muscle aches). How do I know if I have seasonal influenza or Ebola?

2.2 Treatment           

     A. Treatment

     B. Medication

     C. Are there Ways to Treat the Flu or its Symptoms Without Medication?

     D. How Can I Treat Congestion?

     E. How Can I Treat Coughing and Sore Throat?

     F. How Can I Reduce Fevers and Discomfort?

     G. Is it Safe to Take Flu Medications with Other Over-the-Counter or Prescription Medicines?

     H. What are Antiviral Medications and How Can They Help?

     I. Do I Need Antibiotics?

     J. Related Links

2.3 Caring for Someone with the Flu           

     A. How do I Care for the Sick Person?

     B. How do I Keep Myself and Others in the Home from Getting Sick?

     C. Related Links

References           

Chapter 3: Prevention & Vaccination           

3.1 Prevention           

     A. What is the Best Way to Protect Myself and My Family From the Flu?
     B. What Everyday Steps Can I Take to Stop the Spread of Germs?
     C. Are there Medications I Can Take to Prevent Getting the Flu?
     D. Related Links

3.2 Vaccination & Vaccine Safety           

     A. Availability
     B. Where Can I Get the Vaccine?
     C. How Effective is the Flu Vaccine?
     D. When Should I Get the Vaccine?
     E. How Should I Get the Vaccine?
     F. How Long is My Flu Vaccination Good For?
     G. Does the Flu Vaccine Work Right Away?
     H. Is the Vaccine Safe?
     I. Should I Get the Flu Vaccine if I’m Not Feeling Well?
     J.Are there Side Effects?
     K. How Can I Report a Serious Reaction to the Vaccine?
     L. Can I Get the Flu from the Vaccine?
     M. Will I Need to Pay for the Vaccine?
     N. Is there Anyone Who Should Not Get the Vaccine?
     O. Related Links

3.3 Vaccine Development           

     A. How are Vaccines Developed for New and Seasonal Flu Viruses?
     B. How do Flu Vaccines Work?
     C. Are there Challenges to Developing Flu Vaccines?
     D. Related Links

3.4 Key Facts About Seasonal Flu Vaccine           

     A. Flu Vaccination
          1. Why should people get vaccinated against the flu?
          2. How do flu vaccines work?
          3. What kinds of flu vaccines are available?
          4. Are any of the available flu vaccines recommended over others?
          5. Who should get vaccinated this season?
          6. Who should not be vaccinated?
          7. When should I get vaccinated?
          8. Where can I get a flu vaccine?
          9. Why do I need a flu vaccine every year?
          10. Does flu vaccine work right away?
          11. Can I get seasonal flu even though I got a flu vaccine this year?
     B. Vaccine Effectiveness
     C. Vaccine Benefits
          1. What are the benefits of flu vaccination?
     D. Vaccine Match
          1. Will this season’s vaccine be a good match for circulating viruses?
          2. Can the vaccine provide protection even if the vaccine is not a “good” match?
     E. Vaccine Side Effects (What to Expect)
          1. Can the flu vaccine give me the flu?
     F. Vaccine Supply and Distribution

References           

Chapter 4: Risks           

4.1 Children & Infants           

     A. Why are children at higher risk for getting the flu?

     B. How do I protect my child from the flu?

     C. My child is younger than 6 months, what can I do to protect him or her from the flu?

     D. My child has the flu, how do I care for him or her?

     E. When should I seek emergency medical assistance?

     F. My child has the flu. When can he or she go to back to school or day care?

     G. I am breastfeeding and have the flu. Should I continue breastfeeding?

     H. We have pets. How can we keep them healthy?

     I. Related Links

4.2 Pregnant Women           

     A. Why does being pregnant put me at higher risk for getting the flu?
     B. How can I protect myself and my unborn child from the flu?
     C. How can I protect my baby once he or she is born?
     D. If I have the flu, what should I do?
     E. When should I get emergency care?
     F. Related Links

4.3 Seniors           

     A. Why does being older than 65 put me at higher risk for getting the flu?
     B. How can I protect myself from the flu?
     C. Will Medicare cover my flu vaccine?
     D. I have the flu, what should I do?
     E. Related Links

4.4 People with Disabilities           

     A. Why does having a disability put me at higher risk for getting the flu?
     B. How can I protect myself from getting the flu?
     C. I live with or care for someone with a disability. How can I protect him or her from the           flu?
     D. I have the flu. What should I do?

4.5 People with Health Conditions           

     A. Arthritis & the Flu
          1. Why does having arthritis put me at higher risk for getting the flu?
          2. How can I protect myself from getting the flu?
          3. I think I have the flu. What should I do?
          4. Related Links
     B. Asthma & the Flu
          1. Why does having asthma put me at higher risk for getting the flu?
          2. How can I protect myself from getting the flu?
          3. I think I have the flu. What should I do?
          4. Related Links
     C. Cancer & the Flu
          1. Does having cancer put me at higher risk for getting the flu?
          2. How can I protect myself from getting the flu?
          3. I think I have the flu. What should I do?
          4. Related Links
     D. Diabetes & the Flu
          1. Why does having diabetes put me at higher risk for getting the flu?
          2. How can I protect myself from getting the flu?
          3. I think I have the flu. What should I do?
          4. Related Links
     E. Heart Disease & the Flu
          1. Why does having heart disease put me at higher risk for getting the flu?
          2. How can I protect myself from getting the flu?
          3. I think I have the flu. What should I do?
          4. Related Links
     F. HIV/AIDS & the Flu
          1. Why does having HIV/AIDS put me at higher risk for getting the flu?
          2. How can I protect myself from getting the flu?
          3. I think I have the flu. What should I do?
          4. Related Links

4.6 Travelers & People Living Abroad           

     A. I have the flu, can I travel?
     B. How should I prepare for my trip?
     C. Will the vaccine given in the U.S. protect me in other parts of the world?
     D. How can I stay healthy while away?
     E. I am abroad and I think I have the flu. What should I do?
     F. What should I do upon my return?
     G. Related Links

References           

Chapter 5: Planning & Preparedness           

5.1 Business Planning           

     A. Seasonal Flu
     B. Pandemic Flu
          1. Guidance for Employers
          2. OSHA Guidance
          3. DHS Planning Checklist
          4. Information for Employees
          5. OSHA Guidance for Employees
          6. Critical Infrastructure Guide
     C. H5N1 (Bird) Flu
          1. OSHA Guidance

5.2 Community Planning           

     A. Seasonal Flu
     B. Pandemic Flu

5.3 School Planning           

     A. Seasonal Flu
     B. Pandemic Flu
     C. H5N1 (Bird) Flu

5.4 Transportation Planning           

     A. Seasonal Flu
     B. Pandemic Flu
     C. H5N1 (Bird) Flu Guidance - Airline Industry

5.5 Health Professionals           

     A. Seasonal Flu
     B. Pandemic Flu

5.6 State & Local Government           

5.7 Federal Government           

References           

Chapter 6: Pandemic Flu           

6.1 Introduction           

6.2 About Pandemics           

     A. Characteristics and Challenges of a Flu Pandemic

     B. Seasonal Flu versus Pandemic Flu

6.3 History           

     A. 1918 – 1919
          1. Resources

     B. 1957 – 1958

          1. Resource

     C. 1968 – 1969

     D. 2009 – 2010

          1. Resources

6.4 Threats           

     A. 1976

     

     1. Resource

     B. 1977

     C. 1997 and 1999

     

     1. Resource

6.5 Current Situation           

     A. Related Links

6.6 Global Activities           

     A. Monitoring Potential Pandemic Flu

     B. Monitoring H5N1 (Avian) Flu

     C. Pandemic Planning Activities

References           

Chapter 7: Influenza at the Human-Animal Interface (HAI)           

7.1 Introduction           

7.2 How do flu viruses change?           

7.3 How do flu viruses move from animals to humans?           

     A. Related Links

7.4 Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus

     A. H7N9: What should I do?

     B. Genetic Evolution of H7N9 Virus in China, 2013

7.5 H3N2v           

     A. Is H3N2v a threat?

     B. What are the symptoms of H3N2v flu?

     C. How does H3N2v spread?

     D. How can I avoid H3N2v flu?

     E. Does seasonal flu vaccine protect against H3N2v?

     F. Is there an H3N2v vaccine?

     G. What should I do if I think I have H3N2v?

     H. Who monitors H3N2v in the United States?

     I. Can people get swine influenza from eating pork?

     J. Related Links

7.6 H1N1 (originally referred to as Swine Flu)           

     A. What is H1N1 flu?

     B. What are the symptoms of H1N1 flu?

     C. How does H1N1 flu spread?

     D. How can I prevent H1N1 flu?

     E. I have H1N1. What should I do?

     F. Who is monitoring H1N1 in the U.S.?

     G. Related Links

7.7 H5N1 Avian Flu (H5N1 Bird Flu)           

     A. What is highly pathogenic H5N1?

     B. Is highly pathogenic H5N1 virus still a threat?

     C. Could I get highly pathogenic H5N1?

     D. How can I prevent highly pathogenic H5N1 virus infection?

     E. Who monitors highly pathogenic H5N1 virus in the United States?

     F. Related Links

7.8 Influenza at the Human-Animal Interface (HAI)           

7.9 H1N1 (Swine) Flu           

     A. Novel H1N1 Flu: Background on the Situation

     

     1. A Pandemic Is Declared

     

     2. A Virus Emerges

     B. Disease Characteristics

     

     1. How many cases of novel H1N1 flu infection have been reported in the United States?

     

     2. How many people have been infected with novel H1N1 flu?

     

     3. Why did CDC discontinue reporting of individual cases?

     

     4. What is the secondary attack rate of the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus in the household setting?

     

     5. What is the generation time of the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus?

     

     6. What information is there regarding community rates of influenza-like illness associated with the novel H1N1 flu outbreak?

     

     7. How have different age groups in the United States been impacted by novel H1N1 flu in terms of infection rates?

References           

Chapter 8: Research           

8.1 Introduction           

8.2 Virus Research           

     A. Mapping Flu’s Trek Through Our Cells

     

     1. How the Host Helps

     

     2. Found: Flu-Fighting Proteins

     

     3. A Global View of Flu

     

     4. References

8.3 Vaccine Research           

     A. FDA Approves FluBlok

     B. FDA Approves First Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Manufactured Using Cell Culture Technology

     C. HHS Support Results in International Influenza Vaccine Milestone

     D. Clinical Trial of HHS-Supported Flu Vaccine Begins in Vietnam

     E. FDA Approves First Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Manufactured Using Cell Culture Technology

     F. NIH Scientists Advance Universal Flu Vaccine

8.4 Personal Protective Equipment            

8.5 Prediction/Modeling           

     A. NIAID Scientists Propose New Explanation for Flu Virus Antigenic Drift

8.6 Learning from the Past           

     A. Influenza Virus in 1918 and Today

     B. Early Pandemic Flu Wave May Protect Against Worse One Later

     C. Interregional Spread of Influenza Through United States Described by Virus Type, Size of Population and Commuting Rates and Distance

8.7 Technology Transfer           

8.8 H1N1 (Swine Flu) Specific Research           

     A. A Single Base-Pair Change in 2009 H1N1 Hemagglutinin Increases Human Receptor Affinity and Leads to Efficient Airborne Viral Transmission in Ferrets

     B. NIH Study Models H1N1 Flu Spread

     C. The Severity of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza in the United States, from April to July 2009: A Bayesian Analysis

     D. Studies in Animals Suggest 2009 H1N1 Virus May Have Biological Advantage Over Seasonal Influenza Viruses

8.9 H5N1 (Avian Flu) Specific Research            

     A. H5N1: Virus Research

     

     1. Human Antibodies Protect Mice from Avian Flu

     B. H5N1: Learning from the Past

     

     1. Scientists Isolate Genes that Made 1918 Flu Lethal

     

     2. Bacterial Pneumonia Caused Most Deaths in 1918 Influenza Pandemic 304

References           

Chapter 9: Quarantines           

9.1 Introduction           

     A. Federal and State Quarantine and Isolation Authority

Footnotes           

References           

About the Author           

Index           


Share this Product


More from this collection